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Thread: interiors

  1. #1

    interiors

    Walking by the computer and saw this - it's mostly right but missing
    a key ingredient.
    Even the older planes had to use materials qualified to Part 23 (CAR
    3 before that). Believe it or not, most naughahydes even meet the
    fire spec (although some burn REALLY well!) and the 4 yards of
    aircraft naughahyde I paid $15/yd for (to get the cert paper) was
    only about $5/yard at a fabric shop.
    You can use stuff from JoAnne Fabrics Stores or automotive materials
    and nobody cares if you use a car interior shop to stitch it
    together, because you as the owner will be signing for the materials
    used in this "trim". But in the end EVERY material needs to have a
    piece of paper showing it is airworthy (met the fire standards).
    Clue - an often overlooked bit that the FAA inspectors know to look
    for is the use of fireproof thread. Even leather will need to have
    samples sent to a fire lab (some listed in BAC archive) and the test
    of each material will cost about $100. Those hundred dollar bills
    add up, so it's cheaper to buy a few yards at the higher (pre-
    approved) prices.
    In the end, I think I bought one sheet of aluminum for about $180, 4
    yards each of carpet at about $25/yd, naughahyde (walls) at about
    $15/yd, and fabric (seat surfaces) for about $20?/yd. Thread was
    something like $10 and I need to buy foam yet. Total was about
    $450, plus foam, shop supplies, and seatbelt re-webbing of $240.

    The intangible is that it also got the wife involved in the plane
    with picking colors and sewing.
    Bob
    A&P, Aero Eng
    N6504R
    --- In musketeermail@yahoogroups.com, Robert Lewis <vpd401@...>
    wrote:
    >
    > I have yet to confirm this, but in speaking with a
    > shop specializing in interiors, I was told that the
    > new fabrics used in autos all meet or exceed the flame
    > requirements required in most aircraft. I was also
    > told that most older aircraft were certified without
    > flame retardant materials and when flown under part
    > 91, the interior can be installed without what I
    > thought was required flame resistant documentation. If
    > anyone wishes to have an automotive shop install their
    > interior, and they want the flame resistant materials,
    > cans of spray can also be purchased from A/C spruce
    > that will render the material resistant.
    >
    > __________________________________________________
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    >






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  2. #2

    interiors

    >I have yet to confirm this, but in speaking with a shop specializing in
    >interiors, I was told that the new fabrics used in autos all meet or
    >exceed the flame
    >requirements required in most aircraft.

    SAE and Boston Fire Code are both more strict that the FAA's requirements.

    >I was also told that most older aircraft were certified without flame
    >retardant materials and when flown under part 91, the interior can be
    >installed without what I thought was required flame resistant documentation.

    Part 91 does not have to meet the same requirements that Part 121
    (Scheduled Airlines) and Part 135 (Charter/Air Taxi) do, however do you
    WANT flammable materials in your cabin? It really isn't expensive to test
    for flammability, and it will give you peace of mind.

    >If anyone wishes to have an automotive shop install their interior, and
    >they want the flame resistant materials, cans of spray can also be
    >purchased from A/C spruce that will render the material resistant.

    Be aware that SOME flame retardants are SALT based, and can cause corrosion
    when they get wet.

    An excellent treatise on the subject of owner installed interiors can be
    found here: http://www.avweb.com/news/maint/182839-1.html Greg is a friend
    of mine and has one very nice looking interior that he replaced.

    Bob Steward, A&P IA
    Birmingham, AL



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  3. #3

    interiors

    >Even leather will need to have samples sent to a fire lab (some listed in
    >BAC archive) and the test of each material will cost about $100.

    Just TRY and light a piece of leather on fire. Leather is naturally fire
    resistant, because of its moisture and organic makeup, unlike man-made
    materials that have their sources in petro-chemicals. To recycle the old
    joke I've told before, "Ever try to light a cow on fire?".

    The local Jet upholstery shop said they'd certify materials at $40/burn
    test and issue a letter for the aircraft records. You, your mechanic and
    your FSDO may decide that you can perform the burn tests yourself and have
    the mechanic witness tests. I've found the FSDO to be very accommodating
    when it comes to owner preventive maintenance tasks.

    Bob Steward, A&P IA
    Birmingham, AL



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  4. #4

    interiors

    Somebody reminded me that Avweek ran a really good article a few
    years ago, not only on what is required, but why. Bill O'Brien at
    the FAA was the true authority! You can read it at:
    http://www.avweb.com/news/maint/182839-1.html

    It's a confusing subject and this is such a good reference, I'd
    appreciate if it could be linked at BAC.

    Bob

    --- In musketeermail@yahoogroups.com, Robert Lewis <vpd401@...>
    wrote:
    >
    > As a followup, I checked and flame resistant material
    > isn't required. You can however buy a can of spray
    > from A/C spruce that will provide the protection. One
    > post states "Do you really want non flame resistant
    > materials in your cabin?" Well, we all have them. The
    > foam in our seats are not only flammable, the fumes
    > can be toxic. Most of our fleet has wood floor boards
    > and with the exception of a few of us, the boards are
    > most likely old and oil soaked. The plastic parts will
    > burn as well. I believe initially the reason for flame
    > resistant materials came about when people smoked
    > inside their planes. The possibility of dropping ashes
    > or a complete cigarette was more of a possibility then
    > not. I do recommend at least buying the spray
    > retardant from A/C spruce. Use caution to tape off the
    > metal parts as this spray can be corrosive.
    >
    > --- Robert Lewis <vpd401@...> wrote:
    >
    > > I have yet to confirm this, but in speaking with a
    > > shop specializing in interiors, I was told that the
    > > new fabrics used in autos all meet or exceed the
    > > flame
    > > requirements required in most aircraft. I was also
    > > told that most older aircraft were certified without
    > > flame retardant materials and when flown under part
    > > 91, the interior can be installed without what I
    > > thought was required flame resistant documentation.
    > > If
    > > anyone wishes to have an automotive shop install
    > > their
    > > interior, and they want the flame resistant
    > > materials,
    > > cans of spray can also be purchased from A/C spruce
    > > that will render the material resistant.
    > >
    > > __________________________________________________
    > > Do You Yahoo!?
    > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
    > > protection around
    > > http://mail.yahoo.com
    > >
    >
    >
    > __________________________________________________
    > Do You Yahoo!?
    > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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    >






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