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Thread: Hubcaps that have a hole for the valve extension

  1. #1

    Hubcaps that have a hole for the valve extension

    Several folks were looking for hubcaps that would allow for a valve extention and save the aluminum screw holes. Cessna makes a nice set (I think Piper does as well) that fill the bill. The piper ones are very plain and the Cessna ones look like they came off a 57 Plymouth...but they are effective. When cessna sells an aircraft to a flight school...they come without pants and with hubcaps. The hubcaps come off at the first 100 hour inspection and never return. They end up in the shop parts bin or the trash.

    Frankssport

  2. #2

  3. #3
    I solved the hub cap problem by putting studs in the wheels (loctite) and using self-locking nuts (the little acorn shaped ones with the nylon insert). Since the soft wheel threads are never used again for the screws, the threeds do not wear out and you use a nut driver to tighten/loosen the nuts which will not come loose by themselves. No need to crank on them when you tighten them - just snug them so the hub caps do not wiggle. Throw the nut driver in the back seat pocket and it is always handy. A solution that only costs pennies.

  4. #4
    The LoPresti hubcaps now cover the Baby Beech line in their STC. They're about $105 a pair at Sportys and are a nice, durable flexbile plastic (Nylon possibly) with a door that covers the valve stem with a 1/2 turn camlock. I ended up just purchasing a pair of pairs and threw the 4th on the shelf as a spare.

  5. #5
    Sounds good.

    Never heard'a this from others though..

    Think it's a matter for Cleveland to answer to.

    Quote Originally Posted by thirsch
    I solved the hub cap problem by putting studs in the wheels (loctite) and using self-locking nuts (the little acorn shaped ones with the nylon insert). Since the soft wheel threeds are never used again for the screws, the threeds do not wear out and you use a nut driver to tighten/loosen the nuts which will not come loose by themselfs. No need to crank on them when you tighten them - just snug them so the hub caps is does not wiggle. Thorw the nut driver in the back seat pocket and it is always handy. A solution that only costs pennies.

  6. #6
    I only used the normal screw holes and the threads are just a normal screw with the head cut off so what is the difference and why should Cleveland care?

    Quote Originally Posted by simik
    Sounds good.

    Never heard'a this from others though..

    Think it's a matter for Cleveland to answer to.

    Quote Originally Posted by thirsch
    I solved the hub cap problem by putting studs in the wheels (loctite) and using self-locking nuts (the little acorn shaped ones with the nylon insert). Since the soft wheel threeds are never used again for the screws, the threeds do not wear out and you use a nut driver to tighten/loosen the nuts which will not come loose by themselfs. No need to crank on them when you tighten them - just snug them so the hub caps is does not wiggle. Thorw the nut driver in the back seat pocket and it is always handy. A solution that only costs pennies.

  7. #7
    Might just be a screw but as I understand it, falls under a modification & requires approval, or at least a write off from an A&P.

  8. #8
    I believe that it falls under Part 43, Preventitive Maintenance, items (1) Removal, installation, and repair of landing gear tires, (12) Making small simple repairs to fairings, nonstructural cover plates, cowlings, and small patches and reinforcements not changing the contour so as to interfere with proper air flow, and (26) Replacement or adjustment of nonstructural standard fasteners incidental to operations. Even when you do these yourself you should make a logbook entry.
    Quote Originally Posted by simik
    Might just be a screw but as I understand it, falls under a modification & requires approval, or at least a write off from an A&P.

  9. #9
    Read this in MM.


    Musketeermail Message:
    Date: 2003-05-14 06:09:07
    Subject: Re: wheel tapping
    From: Bob Steward

    >It seems to me that you should be able to install a threaded insert, also
    >called helical inserts into the wheel to repair the stripped out threads for
    >your hubcap? Does anyone know?

    I'll admit that I helped a MM member install said heli-coils in his wheels
    to fix this exact problem. At this point, I can't speak to the legality of
    it, but figure that Cleveland PROBABLY will say "NO" if asked.

    Bob Steward
    Birmingham, AL

  10. #10
    So 'don't ask, don't tell'. It's a safe change.

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