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Thread: Lifting the nose

  1. #1

    Lifting the nose

    I have been an active A&P for nearly 30 years. I appreciate
    everyone's concern for damaging the mount trying to pick up the nose
    of the aircraft.

    Some facts need to be brought to light.

    Picking up the front of the aircraft with a "cherry picker" engine
    crane is perfectly safe if done with care.

    If the engine is mounted to the aircraft, the crane hook should be
    attached to the engine mount-to-firewall connection if possible for
    the least stress to any components.

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with using the engine lift ring
    either (found atop most aircraft engines.)
    Remember that the engine mount not only supports the static weight of
    the engine and prop, but must support the weight of the engine
    through the range of vertical "Gs" and loads exerted by the
    gyroscopic force created by the turning propeller.

    Lastly, it is also common practice to use a "soft" sling around the
    propeller blades inboard as close to the hub as possible, and use a
    crane to lift the front of the aircraft. There is a company that has
    been marketing (for years) a floor jack that lifts up under the prop
    blades (inboard) for nosewheel work. I have seen Cessna 210s kept
    aloft for days while nose strut work was being performed.

    Weighting the tail of an aircraft is my LAST choice for raising the
    nose (unless it's tail weighted to our concrete tail stand) and the
    aircraft jacked on the wing jack points.

    I rebuilt my Sundowner's nose strut by lifting on the engine ring
    until the strut could clear the mount. Keep in mind crane type jacks
    are usually hydraulic and it is not uncommon to have them leak down
    over night. I placed a sturdy stool under the engine mount nose gear
    attachment as a precaution. I would also use a "Stool" or other stand
    any time I had to work under a suspended airplane.

    Work safely, Tom




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  2. #2

    Lifting the nose

    I have been an active A&P for nearly 30 years. I appreciate
    everyone's concern for damaging the mount trying to pick up the nose
    of the aircraft.

    Some facts need to be brought to light.

    Picking up the front of the aircraft with a "cherry picker" engine
    crane is perfectly safe if done with care.

    If the engine is mounted to the aircraft, the crane hook should be
    attached to the engine mount-to-firewall connection if possible for
    the least stress to any components.

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with using the engine lift ring
    either (found atop most aircraft engines.)
    Remember that the engine mount not only supports the static weight of
    the engine and prop, but must support the weight of the engine
    through the range of vertical "Gs" and loads exerted by the
    gyroscopic force created by the turning propeller.

    Lastly, it is also common practice to use a "soft" sling around the
    propeller blades inboard as close to the hub as possible, and use a
    crane to lift the front of the aircraft. There is a company that has
    been marketing (for years) a floor jack that lifts up under the prop
    blades (inboard) for nosewheel work. I have seen Cessna 210s kept
    aloft for days while nose strut work was being performed.

    Weighting the tail of an aircraft is my LAST choice for raising the
    nose (unless it's tail weighted to our concrete tail stand) and the
    aircraft jacked on the wing jack points.

    I rebuilt my Sundowner's nose strut by lifting on the engine ring
    until the strut could clear the mount. Keep in mind crane type jacks
    are usually hydraulic and it is not uncommon to have them leak down
    over night. I placed a sturdy stool under the engine mount nose gear
    attachment as a precaution. I would also use a "Stool" or other stand
    any time I had to work under a suspended airplane.

    Work safely, Tom




    ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor --------------------~-->
    Get fast access to your favorite Yahoo! Groups. Make Yahoo! your home page
    http://us.click.yahoo.com/dpRU5A/wUI...LSAA/SyTolB/TM
    --------------------------------------------------------------------~->

    Join BAC today and be a part of the ONLY Type Club for the Musketeer series!

    www.beechaeroclub.org


    Yahoo! Groups Links

    <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/musketeermail/

    <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    musketeermail-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

    <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
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