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Thread: Overweight

  1. #1

    Overweight

    OK, I know I am going to catch a lot of grief with this question.

    If overload my gross by 40 pounds and by the time I fly a 1/2 hour, I would be back under gross. Do you think this could become a major issue or can our planes handle it?

    Brian

    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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  2. #2

    Overweight

    >OK, I know I am going to catch a lot of grief with this question.
    >If overload my gross by 40 pounds and by the time I fly a 1/2 hour, I
    >would be back under gross. Do you think this could become a major issue or
    >can our planes handle it?

    The insidious nature of the busting of GW is that it doesn't immediately
    bite you in the butt if you are not at the edges of the flight envelope.

    Yes, of course you can overload the plane and take off from a long runway
    at a low density altitude that doesn't have any 50 foot trees at the end.

    The other factor is that the stall speed and the power off sink rate go up
    with additional loading.

    You aren't going to break the plane from the 40# stress. The plane has a
    3.8G structural safety factor (when new) and 40# isn't going to cause a
    failure in smooth air and with a light touch on the controls so you never
    spike the G loading.

    That being said, why do you NEED to push the loading over the approved limits?

    Do your passengers know that you are flying a test mission and they are the
    guinea pigs?

    When the engine acts up before you get to pattern altitude and you need
    every knot of airspeed and every foot of altitude to get it on the ground
    safely, will you still be thinking it was a good idea to carry that extra 40#?

    Bob Steward, A&P IA
    Birmingham, AL



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  3. #3

    Overweight

    Is there any data to substantiate a degradation in the
    G loading stress factor with age? It sounds plausable,
    but not good. Not worried, but curious.

    Dan, Sierra N9299S


    --- Bob Steward <n76lima@mindspring.com> wrote:

    >
    > >OK, I know I am going to catch a lot of grief with
    > this question.
    > >If overload my gross by 40 pounds and by the time I
    > fly a 1/2 hour, I
    > >would be back under gross. Do you think this could
    > become a major issue or
    > >can our planes handle it?
    >
    > The insidious nature of the busting of GW is that it
    > doesn't immediately
    > bite you in the butt if you are not at the edges of
    > the flight envelope.
    >
    > Yes, of course you can overload the plane and take
    > off from a long runway
    > at a low density altitude that doesn't have any 50
    > foot trees at the end.
    >
    > The other factor is that the stall speed and the
    > power off sink rate go up
    > with additional loading.
    >
    > You aren't going to break the plane from the 40#
    > stress. The plane has a
    > 3.8G structural safety factor (when new) and 40#
    > isn't going to cause a
    > failure in smooth air and with a light touch on the
    > controls so you never
    > spike the G loading.
    >
    > That being said, why do you NEED to push the loading
    > over the approved limits?
    >
    > Do your passengers know that you are flying a test
    > mission and they are the
    > guinea pigs?
    >
    > When the engine acts up before you get to pattern
    > altitude and you need
    > every knot of airspeed and every foot of altitude to
    > get it on the ground
    > safely, will you still be thinking it was a good
    > idea to carry that extra 40#?
    >
    > Bob Steward, A&P IA
    > Birmingham, AL
    >
    >
    >
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    >
    >
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    > for the Musketeer series!
    >
    > www.beechaeroclub.org
    >
    >
    > Yahoo! Groups Links
    >
    >
    > musketeermail-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >





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  4. #4

    Overweight

    I'm not sure which model you have, but designers have a number of
    reasons to set gross weight, not all of which are structural. For
    example, from an engineering perspective (I don't have Beech data) I'm
    pretty sure that the gross on the 150hp Sports is substantially less
    than models with bigger engines only because of the lack of altitude
    and climb capabilities. So if you are slightly over gross, have
    enough runway, and aren't near the CG limits (which narrow with
    increasing weight), you'll probably be able to fly. However, as Bob
    Steward mentioned, you're a test pilot and you may be a threat to
    others if the runway is marginal in length. In addition, your
    insurance is not in effect and the FAA will hang you if they find
    out.

    As for cyclic fatigue, I look into problem with airliners that
    regularly fly 4,000 hours a YEAR and at percentage load factors that
    NORMALLY are close to gross weight. Even at these loads, transport
    airplanes can rack up well over 100,000 hours in a career! Our little
    Beeches are pretty darn stout, even with the known wing and tail
    issues. Most GA airplanes are neglected to death or worn out long
    before fatigue becomes a problem. If you fly even somewhat according
    to the book and watch for gusts in the yellow/red airspeed bands, then
    have regular annuals that are done the way they should be, I wouldn't
    worry too much about fatigue issues.

    Bob
    A&P, Aero Eng
    N6504R '74 Sport
    --- In musketeermail@yahoogroups.com, "Brian & Bertha Foote"
    <bfoote@e...> wrote:
    >
    > OK, I know I am going to catch a lot of grief with this question.
    >
    > If overload my gross by 40 pounds and by the time I fly a 1/2 hour,
    I would be back under gross. Do you think this could become a major
    issue or can our planes handle it?
    >
    > Brian
    >
    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    >






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  5. #5

    Overweight

    >> Beeches are pretty darn stout, even with the known wing and tail
    >> issues. Most GA airplanes are neglected to death or worn out long


    As a bit of an aside here, For those of us newer to this whole game than
    some of you all, can you elaborate on just what are the "wing and tail
    issues".
    Thanks.
    -Rick





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  6. #6

    Overweight

    AD87-02-08 addressed inspecting the stabilator.
    AD73-20-07 (Rev 2 was 1982) addressed inspecting the wing spar
    brackets. Both ADs and more info are on the BAC site.
    Bob

    --- In musketeermail@yahoogroups.com, "Rick" <rick@d...> wrote:
    >
    > >> Beeches are pretty darn stout, even with the known wing and tail
    > >> issues. Most GA airplanes are neglected to death or worn out
    long
    >
    >
    > As a bit of an aside here, For those of us newer to this whole
    game than
    > some of you all, can you elaborate on just what are the "wing and
    tail
    > issues".
    > Thanks.
    > -Rick
    >






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