Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Overweight

  1. #1

    Overweight

    OK, I know I am going to catch a lot of grief with this question.

    If overload my gross by 40 pounds and by the time I fly a 1/2 hour, I would be back under gross. Do you think this could become a major issue or can our planes handle it?

    Brian
    _______________________________________________
    BAC-Mail mailing list
    BAC-Mail@beechaeroclub.org
    http://www.beechaeroclub.org/mailman/listinfo/bac-mail

  2. #2

    Overweight

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Albert Schmid" <AlphaAv7@cox.net>
    To: "Brian & Bertha Foote" <bfoote@e-mart.tv>
    Sent: Sunday, October 16, 2005 7:12 PM
    Subject: Re: [BAC-Mail] Overweight


    > Hello Brian:
    > I appreciate your question about GTOW.
    > True, at 6 lbs. per gallon and a consumption rate of 12.5 gallons per
    > hour, you will be down about 40 pounds in about 30 minutes.
    >
    > However, you know that your airplane has a maximum takeoff weight. That
    > number was established by the manufacturer demonstrating the performance
    > to the FAA.
    > My "mouse" is 2450 pounds. At sealevel, standard temperature , density
    > altitude, hard surface vs. sod, I am assured that the airplane with
    > takeoff and climb with the maximum power available. With a heavier
    > airplane, you compromise the takeoff parameters.
    > Further more, the airplane has to work harder and climbs or cruises
    > slower than it should. Which will consume more fuel and cost you more
    > money.
    > Probably the most significant compromise if for some reason you have an
    > accident or incident and the insurance company can show that you chose to
    > operate outside of the limitations you may not be covered by your policy.
    > In addition to weight limitation, you should also look at the weight and
    > balance limitations.
    > For example, FORWARD CG. (1) increases the longitudinal stability,
    > increases the angle of attack and gives higher stick forces. (2) Lowers
    > the cruise speed. (3) Increases the stall speed, and (4) requires
    > greater back pressure on the elevator which might result in not being able
    > to keep the nose up high enough for a safe landing.
    >
    > AFT CG (1) decreased the longitudinal stability and the aircraft will
    > tend to pitch up toward a stall during takeoff or landing.
    > (2) Reduces drag, as a smaller angle of attack is needed to maintain
    > altitude.
    > (3) lowers the stall speed because of less wing loading. and (4)
    > provides for poor stall/spin recovery.
    > So, use the Max Gross Take Off Weight limitation for best
    > performance.....and be certain that you are operating within the envelop
    > for Center of Gravity.
    > Happy takeoffs and subsequent landings. Fly Safe.
    > Al Schmid, ATP
    > N7631R BE23 s/n 1252 (1969) 180 hp
    > Quonset Point, RI.
    > ----- Original Message -----
    > From: "Brian & Bertha Foote" <bfoote@e-mart.tv>
    > To: "BAC Mail" <bac-mail@beechaeroclub.org>;
    > <musketeermail@yahoogroups.com>
    > Sent: Sunday, October 16, 2005 4:32 PM
    > Subject: [BAC-Mail] Overweight
    >
    >
    > OK, I know I am going to catch a lot of grief with this question.
    >
    > If overload my gross by 40 pounds and by the time I fly a 1/2 hour, I
    > would be back under gross. Do you think this could become a major issue or
    > can our planes handle it?
    >
    > Brian
    > _______________________________________________
    > BAC-Mail mailing list
    > BAC-Mail@beechaeroclub.org
    > http://www.beechaeroclub.org/mailman/listinfo/bac-mail
    >
    >
    >
    > ---
    >
    > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > Version: 6.0.859 / Virus Database: 585 - Release Date: 2/14/2005


    ---

    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.859 / Virus Database: 585 - Release Date: 2/14/2005

    _______________________________________________
    BAC-Mail mailing list
    BAC-Mail@beechaeroclub.org
    http://www.beechaeroclub.org/mailman/listinfo/bac-mail

  3. #3

    Overweight

    The issue is really performance, not structural integrity. 40 pounds is not a sigificant amount to be over gross. However, it seems that every ski season in Colorado, we have an accident involving an over gross airplane trying to outclimb the terrain. If you have flown your airplane at gross and know what to expect, you'll be ok. Remember, that, at 400 fpm, it takes a mile and a half of horizontal distance to climb 400 feet--more at higher temperatures.

    Carl Link
    N3666Q

    -------------- Original message --------------

    > OK, I know I am going to catch a lot of grief with this question.
    >
    > If overload my gross by 40 pounds and by the time I fly a 1/2 hour, I would be
    > back under gross. Do you think this could become a major issue or can our planes
    > handle it?
    >
    > Brian
    > _______________________________________________
    > BAC-Mail mailing list
    > BAC-Mail@beechaeroclub.org
    > http://www.beechaeroclub.org/mailman/listinfo/bac-mail
    _______________________________________________
    BAC-Mail mailing list
    BAC-Mail@beechaeroclub.org
    http://www.beechaeroclub.org/mailman/listinfo/bac-mail

Similar Threads

  1. Overweight
    By bfoote in forum Musketeer-Mail Archive
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-18-2005, 07:10 AM
  2. Overweight--Load reduction
    By Ashley&Clive in forum Musketeer-Mail Archive
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-17-2005, 07:16 AM
  3. [musketeermail] Overweight
    By rexmaclean at aiinc.com in forum BAC Mail Archive - DO NOT POST HERE
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-16-2005, 09:41 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO