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Thread: annual inspections

  1. #1

    annual inspections

    >I would appreciate it if everyone would post their findings and repairs
    >from their annuals. I would like to get a list of top attention items that
    >appear consistent in our fleet. I also think this will allow us, when a
    >potential members asks for a "Ball Park" figure on the cost of up keep, to
    >present factual information on an average maintenance event. It may prove
    >or disprove some people's ideas that all Beechcraft are expensive to own
    >and maintain.

    What? And give up my list of common faults on the Musketeer series I find
    during inspections?

    OK, here is is, my list of the Top Items found during inspections:

    #1) Corrosion. On the aluminum, on the steel engine mount, on the engine
    case and accessories, and the hardware that holds the entire plane in
    formation as you fly. Recently one of our MM/BAC members had to part his
    plane out after finding corrosion on the wing spar. I bet it didn't grow
    there in the last 11 months since the previous annual. The planes are OLD
    and they are NOT being properly inspected. Deferring corrosion control to
    save the owner a buck is not doing any one a favor.

    #2) Foreign matter. Closely related to #1, in that its often bird nest
    material, and includes moist bio-matter -- even bird bodies on
    occasion. Also wasp nests, both paper wasp and mud daubers are quite
    common contaminants.

    #3) Engines well past the Factory recommended TBO. TBO is defined by
    Lycoming as 12 calendar years or 2000 hours for most models. Consult SI
    1009AR for the latest on each engine model.

    http://www.lycoming.textron.com/supp...s/SI1009AR.pdf

    There are many planes in the fleet that never have gotten to 2000TT, and
    are still running engines that are up to 42 years old without an OH.

    #4) Antique flex hoses! Do your engine hoses still have the black
    (slightly gummy) asbestos firesleeve? I sure find lots that do. That
    stuff is 30 years out of date. Do your shiny orange firesleeved hoses have
    the proper TSO data tag with manufacture date and pressure test proof
    loading information? Many don't, or if they do, they are well past the
    7-10 year industry standard life for rubber hoses. After rescuing a plane
    from a cow pasture because it had antique hoses for the oil cooler that
    passed close to the exhaust (like many Musketeer series do that have front
    mounted oil coolers), you may decide that maybe YOU will take the 7-10 year
    life limit a little more seriously, I know I do. If they don't have the
    TSO tag, then they aren't airworthy. (Ask about the FSDO prosecuting an
    A&P because he was making hoses that didn't meet the TSO with the proper
    fire proof data tag...)

    #5) Wildly inaccurate W&B data that in no way reflects the current
    installed equipment, and does not have the FAA mandated INSTALLED EQUIPMENT
    listing that is dated to match the current W&B. I just removed components
    from a plane that had 35 years ago had is Narco Mark 12 tube Nav-Com
    removed and the W&B "updated". Seems they left the power supply installed,
    powered up on a factory installed CB, and still hot after 35 years... But
    they changed the W&B to reflect the total removal of the radio, indicator,
    power supply AND WIRING. HAH!

    #6) Related to #1, but often undetected or ignored... Corrosion in the
    wheel halves. Inside, where you can't really see well without taking the
    tire off and separating the wheel halves, and then scrubbing out 30 years
    of accumulated crud and dried up grease, to find that the wheel halves are
    PERFORATED!

    I've personally installed 5 or 6 sets of New Cleveland wheels in the past
    couple years. They ain't cheap, and you'll usually have to wait 6-12 WEEKS
    to get a set made up and shipped to your dealer. They'll tell you 3 weeks,
    but not one of the sets I've bought has come in at less than 6, and most
    were 9-12!

    I could go on and on, but you get the idea.

    >The list may also provide a red flag for items some of us overlook. A
    >prime example is the replacement of old ducting to avoid corrosion. Had
    >someone not posted this, I would not have known to replace mine prior to a
    >problem. This could be used for prepurchase as well.
    >Thanks Bob L

    This is yet another example of age and neglect related items that I have seen.

    Bob Steward, A&P IA
    Birmingham, AL



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  2. #2

    annual inspections

    I have come to the conclusion that wiping up all that corrison-x off the hangar floor and the airplane isn't all that bad. It is amazing how much is in a few spray cans.
    Another spot is the battery box after scraping and painting those sealed batteries look good.


    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



    Join BAC today and be a part of the ONLY Type Club for the Musketeer series!

    www.beechaeroclub.org


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    <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/musketeermail/

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