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Thread: Where is my oil screen?

  1. #1
    Orbiting Earth Left the Solar System
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    Where is my oil screen?

    I'm on my way out to the aerodrome after work to change Minnie's oil,
    which I've done several times before.

    I always change the filter and cut it open to look for particles.

    I just read Mike Rellihan's treatise on oil from the BAC archives and it
    says I should also check the oil screen during the oil change. I've never
    done that.

    Where is it?

    I have the Lycoming O-320-D2B (1963 Mouse).

    Cloyd
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  2. #2

    Where is my oil screen?

    There's some confustion on screens...there are two screens - the "suction" screen and the "pressure" screen. The suction screen is at the intake the oil pump, it's in the sump in most engines and is fairly coarse grained - it's main purpose is to protect the oil pump from "gross" contamination like bits dropped down the oil filler. Any large metal will normally get caught there and _not_ make it to the filter/pressure screen, this is why it's important to check it.

    Generally you have a suction screen and either a pressure screen or an oil filter. I'm going to focus on just the Lycoming engines for the rest of this. There's a nice PDF at http://www.lycoming.textron.com/supp...rProcedure.pdf that shows the suction screen location, it's generally on the left side of the oil sump.

    The pressure screen is what does the fine filtration - you either have it or a filter. The term "screen" in the test of this refers to that screen. If you have a filter you don't have a pressure screen...if you have a pressure screen you don't have a filter.

    Most aircraft engines from this era came with an screen instead of a filter...on all Lycoming engines 320 and up the oil screen/filter mount to the same standard 4-bolt pad on upper center of the accessory case (between the mags on the dual mag engines like ours) (the smaller Lycomings have a different pad).

    This standardization has lead to a rich set of fairly easy to install oil filter options including direct spin-on adapters from Lycoming as well as 3rd parties and remote spin-on kits (like Airwolf and ADC) and other filtering options (like the ADC filter). I'd say at this point most of our aircraft have filters given the improved filtering (25 versus 50 hours and <20 microns versus the 60-70 micron filtering of a screen). Athough mine didn't, it's actually getting a remote spin-on adapter installed right now. There are also a few aircraft out there with cartridge filters - the filter is a replaceable paper element inside a metal enclosure, probably the messiest option to replace.

    Looking at the engine it's easy to tell - the screen is in a rounded metal dome about the height of a full length filter but narrower (about 2 1/2").

    There's a nice article on AvWeb with a picture of a screen at http://www.avweb.com/news/maint/191564-1.html <http://www.avweb.com/news/maint/191564-1.html> .

    All of this should be in the operators manual for your engine. Now it's true many of use don't have that available, but it's available from the manufacturer and other sources like Chiefs for pretty decent price for aircraft stuff (usually $30 or so). And consider...14 CFR Part 43 _requires_ one to follow and have access to the procedures for any maintenance task:

    43.13 Performance rules (general).

    (a) Each person performing maintenance, alteration, or preventive maintenance on an aircraft, engine, propeller, or appliance shall use the methods, techniques, and practices prescribed in the current manufacturer's maintenance manual or Instructions for Continued Airworthiness prepared by its manufacturer, or other methods, techniques, and practices acceptable to the Administrator, except as noted in 43.16. He shall use the tools, equipment, and test apparatus necessary to assure completion of the work in accordance with accepted industry practices. If special equipment or test apparatus is recommended by the manufacturer involved, he must use that equipment or apparatus or its equivalent acceptable to the Administrator.

    So - owner _or_ AP - doing an oil change without having at least access to a copy of the Lycoming manual or other legal form of documentation of the procedure is probably _not_ legal.

    -=-
    Mark


    ________________________________

    From: bac-mail-bounces@beechaeroclub.org on behalf of cloydvanhook@imtt.com
    Sent: Tue 5/23/2006 1:37 PM
    To: bac-mail@beechaeroclub.org
    Subject: [BAC-Mail] Where is my oil screen?



    I'm on my way out to the aerodrome after work to change Minnie's oil,
    which I've done several times before.

    I always change the filter and cut it open to look for particles.

    I just read Mike Rellihan's treatise on oil from the BAC archives and it
    says I should also check the oil screen during the oil change. I've never
    done that.

    Where is it?

    I have the Lycoming O-320-D2B (1963 Mouse).

    Cloyd
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    BAC-Mail mailing list
    BAC-Mail@beechaeroclub.org
    http://www.beechaeroclub.org/mailman/listinfo/bac-mail <http://www.beechaeroclub.org/mailman/listinfo/bac-mail>


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  3. #3

    Where is my oil screen?

    > There's some confustion on screens...there are two screens - the "suction"
    > screen and the "pressure" screen. The suction screen is at the intake the
    > oil pump, it's in the sump in most engines

    *** And on the C23, the oil suction screen is fouled by the motor mount
    so you can't completely remove it. You can slide it out a bit to clean
    it.
    But when you do that, you can't change the gasket. How many uses do you
    get out of one of those gaskets, anyway?

    - Jerry Kaidor ( jerry@tr2.com )


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  4. #4

    Where is my oil screen?

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Luther [mailto:leh128@mchsi.com]
    Sent: Wednesday, May 24, 2006 6:43 AM
    To: Richard Grimes
    Subject: Re: [BAC-Mail] Where is my oil screen?

    To remove the oil screen on a B19, C23, B24R, remove the plug/cap from the
    screen then remove the screen. Crush washer(gasket) should be replaced each
    time. Pressure screens are on engines with no oil filter, and there quite a
    few still out there, there are kits to replace the pressure screen. Filtered

    engines oil change is every 50 hours or 3 months, screened engines are 25
    hrs or 3 months.

    Luther



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