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Thread: Cylinder Break-in

  1. #1

    Cylinder Break-in

    The shop owner (and engine guru) came in today and checked things out. He
    determined that the discoloration was due to a thin layer of carbon that
    thinned out as the distance from the piston increased. He also checked the
    bearing play and looked everything else over. The rod end was consistent
    with an engine with a few hours on it, and had no unusual marks. He then
    had Mike and an underling put everything back together. I came over from
    work around lunch time and re-installed the glare shield, compass, and
    seats to speed things up. There was a 182 waiting for the hangar bay, so he
    wanted mine out of the way. He called this afternoon and told me he had run
    the engine and everything was fine, then asked about break-in. I checked
    ECI's website and found the information very confusing, so I called them
    up. The ECI person said to change from Aeroshell 100 Plus to straight
    Aeroshell 100. Then, with a short taxi time, takeoff with a shallow angle
    of climb to keep the airflow up. He suggested circling above the airport
    for two hours, presumably to be able to glide in if there was a problem.
    Then change the oil at 10 hours and again after another 25. After that I
    can go back to Aeroshell 100 Plus.

    I called the mechanic and told him that it needed an oil change and to use
    the straight Aeroshell 100. That could be done outside, so he had the
    assistant do the oil change. It should be ready for the two-hour run-in
    flight after that. I will probably take Friday morning off and do the
    two-hour flight when it is relatively cool. If everything indicates OK, I
    will then proceed to Marana and park the Sundowner back in its proper
    space. I should have a few minutes on Wednesday to pick up a couple of
    cases of Aeroshell 100, and a case of 100 Plus. I will drop one case of 100
    off at the shop to replace what they used today and use the other case for
    the 10 and 25 hour changes.

    All-in-all a good bout of experience at a reasonable cost. At work, the
    mechanical engineers cringe when one of us electronics engineers picks up a
    wrench, but I think I am doing OK.

    Thanks again to everyone who provided suggestions and encouragement.
    Musketeermail and BAC are a great bunch of enthusiasts with a wealth of
    information.

    Carl Foster Sundowner 9761L Tucson , AZ



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  2. #2

    ECI

    I put the exact cylinder in my plane last year. I did the same break in and all appears well. I will be doing my annual in about a month so I will be able to check the compression on this cylinder to see how it has done over the year.

    Al

  3. #3

    Cylinder Break-in

    Fellow Musketeer Drivers,

    After a busy week I finally got a chance to do the initial break-in of the
    new cylinders. I took the advice of a sage mechanic who suggested that I
    take the whole runway to take off and watch all of the instruments before
    departing the runway. I wanted the 11,000-foot runway at Tucson
    International, but there was too much commercial traffic so I got the
    8000-foot runway instead. The runup with the P-1000 tach was great. When
    going from both to left or right, the tach computes the RPM drop and shows
    that one mag is inoperative. I accelerated slowly while watching the oil
    pressure, oil temperature, and tach for anything that looked like trouble.
    Everything was smooth, so I gradually applied full power and lifted off at
    85 mph instead of the usual 75 mph. I kept the climbout shallow to keep the
    airflow up.

    After I got up to 6500 feet and was in the south practice area, I told the
    TRACON controller that this was the first flight after major engine work
    and I wanted to stay close to the airport. He cleared me to make a
    racetrack pattern southwest of the airport, so I headed back and started
    the orbits. At first, the oil pressure indicated higher than I had seen it
    before, but still in the green. I was running straight 50-weight mineral
    oil, and I figured that may be the difference. I kept an eye on the oil
    temperature and pressure as well as the tach. The engine was back to full
    power, and the indicated airspeed was back to 115 mph instead of 105 mph.
    The work has restored the performance. After about 30 minutes the oil
    pressure was back to the middle of the green, which is where it usually sits.

    I ran a left-hand racetrack for the first hour, then switched to a
    right-hand pattern for the second hour. I turned the ADF on and listened to
    the local oldies station and did a little in-flight Karioke to wile away
    the time. I had the answer to an oldies trivia question, too, but couldn't
    call in to the KOOL 1450 Trivia Line to claim my prize. Maybe next time. It
    was also interesting to watch the airport for an extended time. Since I was
    3000 feet above the traffic pattern and off to one side, I did not receive
    any traffic calls. The combination of the digital tachometer and the
    newly-installed vernier mixture control made leaning for maximum power
    relatively easy. When everything is trimmed out and stable, turn the
    mixture control a quarter turn and watch the tach. A change of as little as
    5 RPM is instantly visible.

    After two hours of flying what amounts to an elongated holding pattern,
    watching gauges, and singing to myself through the intercom, I called
    approach and told them that I was heading for Marana Northwest Airport.
    Since no one there had talked with me for almost two hours and there was a
    personnel change, I had to remind them who I was. The wind was up by now
    and the thermals were clearly evident by the bumps in the air and the need
    to tighten my seat belt a bit. Another good reason to have a Beech machine
    is the headroom. I don't worry about hitting my head on the headliner. When
    I was in the descent, the engine was running around 2680 RPM. When I hit a
    sudden downdraft, the engine unloaded and ran to 2705 RPM and the big red
    light on the tach lit up until the airplane stabilized in the downdraft and
    slowed back to 2680. The bright light really caught my attention and is a
    useful indicator of overspeed in a descent.

    I made a less than smooth landing in the unstable and rapidly changing
    winds. I taxied over to my usual space (number 8 and tied down between a
    Skymaster and a huge turboprop AG plane that had been converted to a
    fire-fighting tanker. As soon as I opened the door, I could smell the hot
    paint on the new cylinders. When I was putting the cover on the plane, a
    dust devil came across the tiedown area and almost took the cover and me
    with it, but I managed to hang on. It felt good to be ready and able to go
    flying again. The new mixture control, new tach, and new cylinders all
    added up to improved flying enjoyment. I have a PDF version of the Horizon
    Tach 337 that was approved within a week with no further questions. Email
    me directly and I will send it to you to use as an example. I also have a
    tach and relatively new cable. Contact me directly if you are interested.

    Carl Foster Sundowner 9761L Tucson AZ



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  4. #4

    Cylinder Break-in

    --- In musketeermail@yahoogroups.com, Carl Foster <carlfoster@c...> wrote:
    > Fellow Musketeer Drivers,

    <snip>

    > At first, the oil pressure indicated higher
    >than I had seen it before, but still in the
    >green. I was running straight 50-weight mineral
    >oil, and I figured that may be the difference.

    I'm quite concerned about the big end plain bearing here, where the
    piston pin was hammered out, while at TDC, with jug removed.

    IMO, this may be "dooable" if piston is supported somehow & might
    consider it for morocycles. What method may have been used to support
    the piston, while hammering the pin out?

    My experience is Ltd to motorcycle mechs & ~ 30 years ago was faced
    with piston pin removal. In this similar situation, the manuals stated
    that hammering the pin out in this manner was strictly "verboten," as
    big end bearing damage was a likely consequence...(to say the least.)

    Bob's comments were: "Mike Rellihan and I have discussed this off
    list. There is no suggestion in the Lycoming Direct Drive OH Manual
    for tapping a piston pin out with a hammer."

    I'd suggest then, that for aircraft engine maintenace (as per Lyc):
    "this is not recommended or approved".

    Wouldn't be surprised by grey areas though.

    Any more info on method used in hammering out the piston pin? In
    particular, how piston was 'supported' while hammering pin out from
    the side?

    Jon





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