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Thread: Zero-Flap Slips

  1. #1

    Zero-Flap Slips

    After reading all of the traffic regarding slips, I thought I would try
    something different for a rapid descent. I returned from San Diego today
    and stayed up at 9500 feet, where it was about 60 degrees, until I was
    within about 12 miles of the airport, where it was 106 degrees (42 C). I
    slowed down to cool the engine before making the 8000-foot descent as
    quickly as possible. I selected the right tank (fullest), dropped the left
    wing, applied right rudder and started down. Since no one was in the
    pattern (I wonder why) I went for a straight-in to avoid another 5 minutes
    in the heat at pattern speeds. The slip worked fine, and kept the airspeed
    and engine RPM in check. In the past I have used a low-power high-speed
    dive to get down quickly, but with continuous light turbulence like there
    was today, the slip worked much better, and the ride was very stable, and
    the descent was steeper. I levelled off at the pattern altitude two miles
    out, slowed to 100 mph and went through the landing checklist. A dust devil
    drifted across the far end of Runway 12 as I made the final approach and
    touchdown. I raised the flaps and slowed to about 40 mph and my wife opened
    her door to get some airflow. I opened mine as soon as I was clear of the
    runway. The slip made a perfectly tolerable summertime descent, and we were
    not overheated when I pulled into the shadeport just far enough to get the
    windscreen out of the sun.

    I have used full-flap slips for short times to land closer to the end of
    the runway, but only for several seconds. I always make sure I am feeding
    fuel from the high-wing tank before starting the slip. I learned this a few
    years back in a 182. The fuel tank vent is on the left wing and faces
    forward. The ram air increases the pressure in the left tank just enough to
    empty a bit faster than the right tank. I also had one passenger in the
    back seat who was sitting on the right side. I had switched from "both" to
    "right" to balance the plane. We were over Rainbow Bridge east of Lake
    Powell and my wife and the person in the back seat wanted a better picture
    of the bridge. I put the plane into a right-wing down slip. While they were
    snapping away, the engine became very quiet. I immediately levelled off and
    power returned within a few seconds. I figured out what had happened rather
    quickly. I now verify the tank selector position before doing any slips at
    any altitude.

    Carl Foster Sundowner 9761L Tucson AZ



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  2. #2

    Zero-Flap Slips

    I, too, have always slipped a sundowner with great
    sucess and never a problem. From full flaps to no
    flaps, but always fed from the high wing.

    Dan, Sierra N9299S

    --- Carl Foster <carlfoster@comcast.net> wrote:

    > After reading all of the traffic regarding slips, I
    > thought I would try
    > something different for a rapid descent. I returned
    > from San Diego today
    > and stayed up at 9500 feet, where it was about 60
    > degrees, until I was
    > within about 12 miles of the airport, where it was
    > 106 degrees (42 C). I
    > slowed down to cool the engine before making the
    > 8000-foot descent as
    > quickly as possible. I selected the right tank
    > (fullest), dropped the left
    > wing, applied right rudder and started down. Since
    > no one was in the
    > pattern (I wonder why) I went for a straight-in to
    > avoid another 5 minutes
    > in the heat at pattern speeds. The slip worked fine,
    > and kept the airspeed
    > and engine RPM in check. In the past I have used a
    > low-power high-speed
    > dive to get down quickly, but with continuous light
    > turbulence like there
    > was today, the slip worked much better, and the ride
    > was very stable, and
    > the descent was steeper. I levelled off at the
    > pattern altitude two miles
    > out, slowed to 100 mph and went through the landing
    > checklist. A dust devil
    > drifted across the far end of Runway 12 as I made
    > the final approach and
    > touchdown. I raised the flaps and slowed to about 40
    > mph and my wife opened
    > her door to get some airflow. I opened mine as soon
    > as I was clear of the
    > runway. The slip made a perfectly tolerable
    > summertime descent, and we were
    > not overheated when I pulled into the shadeport just
    > far enough to get the
    > windscreen out of the sun.
    >
    > I have used full-flap slips for short times to land
    > closer to the end of
    > the runway, but only for several seconds. I always
    > make sure I am feeding
    > fuel from the high-wing tank before starting the
    > slip. I learned this a few
    > years back in a 182. The fuel tank vent is on the
    > left wing and faces
    > forward. The ram air increases the pressure in the
    > left tank just enough to
    > empty a bit faster than the right tank. I also had
    > one passenger in the
    > back seat who was sitting on the right side. I had
    > switched from "both" to
    > "right" to balance the plane. We were over Rainbow
    > Bridge east of Lake
    > Powell and my wife and the person in the back seat
    > wanted a better picture
    > of the bridge. I put the plane into a right-wing
    > down slip. While they were
    > snapping away, the engine became very quiet. I
    > immediately levelled off and
    > power returned within a few seconds. I figured out
    > what had happened rather
    > quickly. I now verify the tank selector position
    > before doing any slips at
    > any altitude.
    >
    > Carl Foster Sundowner 9761L Tucson AZ
    >
    >
    >
    > Join BAC today and be a part of the ONLY Type Club
    > for the Musketeer series!
    >
    > www.beechaeroclub.org
    >
    >
    > Yahoo! Groups Links
    >
    >
    > musketeermail-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >




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