This happened about 4 years ago at my home airport 8000 ft runway,
engine out on take-off CFII and Private Pilot, both perished trying to
make the turn back to the airport.

I'd be very careful.

Shelby
On Thursday, August 4, 2005, at 11:29 AM,
bac-mail-request@beechaeroclub.org wrote:

> Even though I have done this, and my low time CFI
> wanted to prove to me that I could do it and have
> altitude to spare during my bi annual flight review,
> I'm not going rank turning back over landing withing
> 45 degrees of either side of straight ahead. Unless
> everyone forgets, there is a huge difference in
> practice emergency landings with idle power and a REAL
> dead stick landing. It all depends on what side of
> the runway end lights that you want to land. If you
> are used to making emergency landings with idle power,
> it would not be uncommon for you to come up 200 feet
> short of the runway under a real dead stick situation.
> So unless your practice emergency landing procedures
> ALWAYS put you 300 or more feet past where you wanted
> to land, you might want to consider a place you can
> see out ahead of you.
>
> Jay
>
> --- cloydvanhook@imtt.com wrote:
>
>> ----- Forwarded by Cloyd Van Hook/IMTT on 08/04/2005
>> 10:30 AM -----
>>
>> "Iftikhar, Osman" <Osman.Iftikhar@delta.com>
>> 08/04/2005 10:19 AM
>>
>> To
>> <cloydvanhook@imtt.com>
>> cc
>> "Brad Mitchell" <bmitchell@aaep.org>
>> Subject
>> RE: Simulated engine failure on takeoff
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> I don't have a clue how to go to BAC-Mail even
>> though I signed up for it.
>> Last time I tried to put a message on there it said
>> someone will have to
>> approve it or some bullshit like that.
>>
>> You should use 2 miles per thousand foot rule for
>> engine out. 80kts flaps
>> up works best. Try this link it'll dispel all of
>> those myths about
>> landing straight ahead. From 500ft you can turn
>> back with altitude to
>> spare. But of course some low life CFI or a private
>> pilot will tell you
>> otherwise. I'm sick of all of you non-skygod types.
>>
>>
>> N9595W, a 1967 PA-140, departs Merritt Island
>> Airport (COI) on Runway 11.
>> At 500 feet, the throttle is retarded to idle and
>> the aircraft makes an
>> immediate turn to land on Runway 29. This
>> illustrates how quick headwork
>> and practice can allow for a safe landing in the
>> event of a low altitude
>> power loss.
>>
>> The camera is mounted on the vertical stabilizer of
>> N9595W looking
>> forward. N9595W is owned and piloted by Jan Zysko,
>> NASA.
>>
>>
>>
>> From: cloydvanhook@imtt.com
>> [mailto:cloydvanhook@imtt.com]
>> Sent: Thursday, August 04, 2005 10:27 AM
>> To: Iftikhar, Osman
>> Cc: o_iftikhar@bellsouth.net
>> Subject: Fw: Simulated engine failure on takeoff
>>
>>
>> I sent this to BAC Mail. You're probably too lazy
>> or too high brow to
>> sign up but I figured you'd have some pithy comments
>> to make.
>>
>> Some MIGHT even be useful, Oh Sky God.
>>
>> ----- Forwarded by Cloyd Van Hook/IMTT on 08/04/2005
>> 09:26 AM -----
>> Cloyd Van Hook/IMTT
>> 08/04/2005 08:27 AM
>>
>>
>> To
>> BAC Mail
>> cc
>>
>> Subject
>> Simulated engine failure on takeoff
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Awhile ago I asked a question about what's the best
>> bank angle to use to
>> lose the least altitude in an engine out situation.
>>
>> Fred Black sent me a link (which isn't working this
>> am) to an excellent
>> article that said the answer is 45 degrees.
>>
>> I was wondering if any of you have practiced an
>> engine out on takeoff.
>> I've always read that unless your altitude is more
>> than X you should land
>> straight ahead or you won't make it back to the
>> runway.
>>
>> Once I get Minnie's annual done, hopefully this
>> Saturday, I'm going to go
>> out and practice. Guess I'll try it at a few
>> thousand feet to start and
>> see if I can figure out what X is.
>>
>> I'm wondering if any of you have tried this and what
>> you come with for X
>> altitude (i.e. how much altitude on takeoff have you
>> found you need to
>> make it back to the runway if you lose your engine
>> on takeoff.
>>
>> Cloyd
>> President, BAC

_______________________________________________
BAC-Mail mailing list
BAC-Mail@beechaeroclub.org
http://www.beechaeroclub.org/mailman/listinfo/bac-mail