Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: [musketeermail] Nose wheel stuff

  1. #1

    [musketeermail] Nose wheel stuff

    Bob knows this well, but as a reminder for those less experienced....

    If you use the tail-down method, whether a weight, tail stand, or tie-down anchor, take care with how you get the tail down. Unlike the wing rings, the tail ring is aluminum alloy. The associated structure is designed to handle primarily vertical loads on the ring. It can be damaged by being yanked side-to-side or fore-and-aft with too much vigor or at too wide an angle. In fact, though it is widely ignored, there is a caution in one of the manuals against using the tail ring to pull the plane around. It clearly has to hold the plane against wind loads, and isn't exactly fragile, but just exercise care.

    A related concern is the Stabilator spar and internal structure. There were some cracking problems with the original early sixties internal structure design, and the structure was beefed up a bit in subsequent versions. There are cautions in the manuals against any significant lifting or pushing down on the Stabilator. One of the preflight tasks is to gently move the tip of the Stab up and down. This is to check for loose pivot bearings or brackets, but is also to detect any cracked structure by hearing "oil can" or popping noises or excessive play. If you must press down on the Stab, the safest place to do it is right above the pivot bearing, up against the fuselage. Never let a helper push down or pull up anywhere else on the Stabilator. An over-eager friend can do a tremendous amount of expensive damage on a plane.

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: Bob Swaim
    To: musketeermail@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2005 8:03 AM
    Subject: [musketeermail] Re: Nose wheel stuff


    I've seen ceiling and engine lifts used successfully, but it's sure
    easier to just pull the tail down with a concrete block. You also
    won't then have to maneuver around the hoist or worry about the
    mounts. Just make sure the block & attachment (use chain!) is heavy
    enough if people get in the cabin or lean on the engine! Long ago,
    I got to see an incident in which a Mooney tail was put through the
    ceiling during a gear swing check.
    Bob
    A&P, Aero Eng

    --- In musketeermail@yahoogroups.com, "Al ODonnell"
    <sundowner6699x@y...> wrote:
    > Group,
    >
    > I saw the wooden brace someone used on BAC photo to hold up the
    front
    > of the plane while working on the nose wheel and or donuts. I
    have a
    > friend in the next hangar who has a portable auto engine lifter.
    It is
    > use to take car engines out of cars. Can anyone see any reason I
    could
    > not use this to hold up the front of the plane while working on
    the
    > nose gear?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Al




    Join BAC today and be a part of the ONLY Type Club for the Musketeer series!

    www.beechaeroclub.org





    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

    a.. Visit your group "musketeermail" on the web.

    b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    musketeermail-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

    c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    _______________________________________________
    BAC-Mail mailing list
    BAC-Mail@beechaeroclub.org
    http://www.beechaeroclub.org/mailman/listinfo/bac-mail

  2. #2

    [musketeermail] Nose wheel stuff

    > Bob knows this well, but as a reminder for those less experienced....
    >
    > If you use the tail-down method, whether a weight, tail stand, or tie-down
    > anchor, take care with how you get the tail down.

    *** Or, better yet, don't use the tail-down method at all. Why do you
    need to? You can raise the nose perfectly well with a scissor jack
    under the nose gear per the Beech manual.

    A "perfect" scissor jack can be made by putting a pad of epoxy putty
    on top of an ordinary jack. Then put some plastic wrap on top of the
    putty. Then you put the jack under the gear and raise
    it gently until the putty smooshes in. Fifteen minutes later, the putty
    is hard as a rock, and you have a jack with a top that exactly matches the
    gear.

    Of course, if you want to do any serious work, you then need to support
    the nose with something better than a jack. Fabricating a cradle for the
    firewall is a bit more of a project than one can describe in a short
    email. Check the BAC & MM archives!

    The only lifting equipment I am lacking at this time is something for
    the wings. Anybody know if they can be supported with a pair of
    plywood/carpet cradles? Or are the Beech jack pads the best bet?

    - Jerry Kaidor ( jerry@tr2.com )


    _______________________________________________
    BAC-Mail mailing list
    BAC-Mail@beechaeroclub.org
    http://www.beechaeroclub.org/mailman/listinfo/bac-mail

Similar Threads

  1. [musketeermail] More Aileron stuff
    By Rellihan in forum BAC Mail Archive - DO NOT POST HERE
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-03-2006, 07:04 PM
  2. [musketeermail] Nose wheel shimmy
    By danielkirby in forum BAC Mail Archive - DO NOT POST HERE
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-13-2005, 10:15 AM
  3. [BAC-Mail] Nose wheel stuff
    By jkaidor in forum Musketeer-Mail Archive
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-30-2005, 08:23 AM
  4. Nose wheel stuff
    By sundowner6699x in forum Musketeer-Mail Archive
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-30-2005, 07:38 AM
  5. Nose wheel stuff
    By BeechSportBill in forum BAC Mail Archive - DO NOT POST HERE
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-29-2005, 09:47 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO